Organizing Committee
Abstract

In the field of hyperbolic conservation laws, theory, computation, and applications are deeply connected, with each one providing to the other two technical support as well as insights. Major progress has been achieved, over the past 40 years, on the theory and computation of solutions in one space dimension. By contrast, the multi-space dimensional case is still covered by mist, which is now gradually lifting, revealing new vistas. For instance, in two space dimensions, significant progress has been achieved in the study of transonic gas flow, of central importance to aerodynamics. Parallel progress has been reported on the numerical side, with the design of high-order accurate discontinuous Galerkin and finite volume computational schemes, even for multidimensional systems. Finally, we are witnessing an explosion in the applications, not only on the traditional turf of fluid dynamics but also in new directions, in materials science, biology, traffic theory, etc.

Nevertheless, the theory and the numerics of hyperbolic conservation laws are currently facing major challenges. The recent construction of infinitely many solutions to the Cauchy problem for the Euler equations of gas dynamics and the emergence, in theory, and computation, of very weak, measure-valued, solutions raises the issue of whether the setting of nonlinear systems of conservation laws is autonomous and self-sufficient, or whether it should be enriched with new principles of mathematical and/or physical provenance. All three constituents, theory, numerics and modeling, should have an input for clarifying these issues.

This workshop brings together researchers in hyperbolic conservation laws to present the most significant theoretical and computational advances and discuss applications as well as challenges. The aim of the workshop is to explore the connections among theoretical, numerical, and applied aspects related to hyperbolic conservation laws, and stimulate discussions and collaborations among these areas. The face-to-face communication of the participants in the workshop will be a catalyst for scientific progress in theory, numerics, and applications.

Image for "VIRTUAL ONLY: Advances and Challenges in Hyperbolic Conservation Laws"
This image shows the density of the Mach 800 magnetohydrodynamic jet flow, computed by a positivity-preserving discontinuous Galerkin method. Source: Kailiang Wu and Chi-Wang Shu, A provably positive discontinuous Galerkin method for multidimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamics. SIAM J. Sci. Comput. 40 (2018), no. 5, B1302-B1329

Confirmed Speakers & Participants

  • Speaker
  • Poster Presenter
  • Attendee
  • Virtual Attendee
  • Remi Abgrall
    University of Zurich
  • Pedro Aceves Sanchez
    North Carolina State University at Raleigh
  • Aekta Aggarwal
    Indian Institute of Management Indore
  • Christopher Alexander
    University of California
  • Debora Amadori
    University of L'Aquila
  • Boris Andreianov
    University of Tours
  • Florian Atteneder
    Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena
  • blanca ayuso de dios
    universita milano-bicocca
  • Matania Ben-Artzi
    Hebrew University of Jerusalem
  • Alberto Bressan
    The Pennsylvania State University
  • Jolene Britton
    University of California, Riverside
  • Jurriaan Buist
    Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica (CWI)
  • Zhiqiang Cai
    Purdue University
  • Suncica Canic
    University of Houston
  • Wenden Charles
    Federal University of Acre
  • Ming Chen
    University of Pittsburgh
  • Gui-Qiang Chen
    University of Oxford
  • Zheng “Leslie” Chen
    University of Massachusetts Dartmouth
  • Yingda Cheng
    Michigan State University
  • Alina Chertock
    North Carolina State University
  • Siu Wun Cheung
    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
  • Maria Chiri
    Penn State University
  • Cleopatra Christoforou
    University of Cyprus
  • Ivan Christov
    Purdue University
  • Alexander Cliffe
    University of Oxford
  • Bernardo Cockburn
    University of Minnesota
  • Giuseppe Coclite
    Politecnico di Bari
  • Rinaldo Colombo
    Univsity of Brescia
  • Andrea Corli
    University of Ferrara
  • Constantine Dafermos
    Brown University
  • Mihalis Dafermos
    Princeton University
  • Dihan Dai
    University of Utah
  • Mustafa Danis
    Iowa State University
  • Camillo De Lellis
    IAS
  • Shiladittya Debnath
    WBUT
  • Asha Dond
    Indian Institute of Science Education and Research,
  • Bo Dong
    University of Massachusetts Dartmouth
  • Prerona Dutta
    North Carolina State University
  • Aseel Farhat
    Florida State University
  • Ricardo Fariello
    Universidade Estadual de Montes Claros
  • Eduard Feireisl
    Czech Academy of Sciences
  • Mikhail Feldman
    University of Wisconsin
  • Ulrik Fjordholm
    University of Oslo
  • Rodney Fox
    Iowa State University
  • Heinrich Freistuehler
    University of Konstanz
  • Guosheng Fu
    University of Notre Dame
  • Andrés Galindo-Olarte
    MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
  • Ajeet Gary
    New York University
  • James Glimm
    Stony Brook University
  • William Golding
    University of Texas at Austin
  • Pedro González Rodelas
    University of Granada
  • Venu Gopal
    Dr. Bhim Rao Ambedkar College, University of Delhi
  • Sigal Gottlieb
    University of Massachusetts Dartmouth
  • Graaziano Guerra
    Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca
  • Vincenzo Gulizzi
    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
  • Wei Guo
    Texas Tech University
  • Christiane Helzel
    Heinrich-Heine-Universität Düsseldorf
  • Helge Holden
    Norwegian University of Science and Technology
  • Yannick Holle
    RWTH Aachen University
  • John Holmes
    Wake Forest University
  • Rentian Hu
    University of Notre Dame
  • Juntao Huang
    Michigan State University
  • Feimin Huang
    Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences
  • Kuang Huang
    Columbia University
  • John Hunter
    University of California Davis
  • Xiaokai Huo
    Vienna University of Technology
  • Ameya Jagtap
    Division of Applied Mathematics
  • Shashank Jaiswal
    Purdue University
  • Pranava Jayanti
    University Of Maryland College Park
  • Katarina Jegdic
    University of Houston - Downtown
  • Yan Jiang
    University of Science and Technology of China
  • David Ketcheson
    King Abdullah University of Science & Technology
  • Barbara Keyfitz
    The Ohio State University
  • Soyeon Kim
    Sogang university
  • Christian Klingenberg
    Wuerzburg University
  • Julian Koellermeier
    KU Leuven
  • Grigorios Kounadis
    KAUST
  • Rakesh Kumar
    TIFR Centre for Applicable Mathematics
  • Philippe LeFloch
    Laboratoire Jacques-Louis Lions Université Pierre et Marie Curie
  • Randall LeVeque
    University of Washington
  • Fengyan Li
    Rensselaer Polytechinic Institute
  • Zhilei Liang
    Southwestern University of Finance and Economics
  • Tai-Ping Liu
    Stanford University
  • SONG LIU
    Academy of Mathematics and System Science, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences
  • Yuan Liu
    Wichita State University
  • Chen Liu
    Rice University
  • Xin Liu
    Weierstrass Institute
  • Reza Malek-Madani
    U.S. Naval Academy
  • Kyle Mandli
    Columbia University in the City of New York
  • Raed Marabeh
    Universidad de Granada
  • Pierangelo Marcati
    Gran Sasso Science Institute
  • Francesca Marcellini
    University of Brescia
  • Simon Markfelder
    University of Cambridge
  • Lin Mu
    University of Georgia
  • Nimra Muqaddass
    University of Palermo
  • Markus Musch
    University of Oslo
  • Matan Mussel
    National Institutes of Health
  • Evangelos Nastas
    SUNY
  • Thuong Nguyen
    University of Utah
  • Tien Khai Nguyen
    North Carolina State University
  • Ronghua Pan
    Georgia Instiute of Technology
  • Zhichao Peng
    Michigan State University
  • Zhijun (George) Qiao
    University of Texas Rio Grande Valley
  • Tong Qin
    University of Michigan
  • Changxin Qiu
    Iowa State University
  • Jingmei Qiu
    University of Delaware
  • Ricardo Quispe Mendizábal
    Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos
  • Raaghav Ramani
    University of California, Davis
  • Samala Rathan
    Indian Institute of Petroleum and Energy Visakhapatnam India
  • Michael Redle
    North Carolina State University
  • Donsub Rim
    New York University
  • Victor Roytburd
    National Science Foundation
  • Adrian Ruf
    ETH Zürich
  • Tommaso Ruggeri
    University of Bologn
  • Noussaiba Saadoudi
    UMBB & USTHB
  • Mohammad Sarraf Joshaghani
    Rice University
  • Ralph Saxton
    University of New Orleans
  • Matthew Schrecker
    University College London
  • Ridgway Scott
    University of Chicago
  • Denis Serre
    Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon
  • Sarswati Shah
    University of Delhi
  • Wen Shen
    The Pennsylvania State University
  • Chi-Wang Shu
    Brown University
  • Sergio Silva
    Universidad Distrital Francisco Jose de Caldas
  • Marshall Slemrod
    University of Wisconsin
  • Christos Sourdis
    University of Athens
  • Laura Spinolo
    IMATI-CNR
  • Zheng Sun
    The Ohio State University
  • Jiawei Sun
    Ohio State University
  • Eitan Tadmor
    University of Maryland
  • Tessa Thorsen
    University of Maryland
  • Dr. Amit Tomar
    Amity University Noida, India
  • Konstantina Trivisa
    University of Maryland
  • Athanasios Tzavaras
    King Abdullah University of Science and Technology
  • Alexis Vasseur
    University of Texas at Austin
  • T.S.Sachin Venkatesh
    Delhi Technological University
  • David Wagner
    University of Houston
  • Yixuan Wang
    University of Pittsburgh
  • Dehua Wang
    University of Pittsburgh
  • DIXI WANG
    university of florida
  • Stephen Watson
    University of Glasgow
  • Franziska Weber
    Carnegie Mellon University
  • Kailiang Wu
    Southern University of Science and Technology
  • FENG XIAO
    Academy of Mathemtics and Systems Science, Chinese Academy of Science
  • Yulong Xing
    The Ohio State University
  • Ziyao Xu
    Brown University
  • Jue Yan
    Iowa State University
  • Yang Yang
    Michigan Technological University
  • Anqi Ye
    University of Maryland
  • Chin Ching Yeung
    University of Oxford
  • Xinyue Yu
    brown university
  • Lei Yu
    Tongji University
  • Difan Yuan
    Beijing Normal University/ University of Brescia
  • Yukun Yue
    Carnegie Mellon University
  • Vasilis Zafiris
    University of Houston-Downtown
  • Dongbing Zha
    Donghua University
  • Xu Zhang
    Oklahoma State University
  • Yongtao Zhang
    University of Notre Dame
  • Fan Zhang
    KU Leuven
  • Xiangxiong Zhang
    Purdue University
  • Ming Zhong
    Johns Hopkins University
  • MAXIM Zyskin
    University of Oxford

Workshop Schedule

Monday, May 17, 2021
  • 9:45 - 10:00 am EDT
    Welcome
    Virtual
    • Brendan Hassett, ICERM/Brown University
  • 10:00 - 10:30 am EDT
    Existence theory for viscoelasticity of Kelvin-Voigt type with nonconvex stored energies
    Virtual
    • Speaker
    • Athanasios Tzavaras, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology
    • Session Chair
    • Alberto Bressan, The Pennsylvania State University
    Abstract
    I will review the existence and uniqueness theory for viscoelasticity of Kelvin-Voigt type with non-convex stored energies. The analysis is based on propagation of $H^1$-regularity for the deformation gradient of weak solutions in two and three dimensions assuming that the stored energy satisfies the Andrews-Ball condition, in particular allowing for non-monotone stresses. By contrast, a counterexample indicates that for non-monotone stress-strain relations (even in 1-d) initial oscillations of the strain lead to solutions with sustained oscllations. In two space dimensions, it turns out that weak solutions with deformation gradient in $H^1$ are in fact unique, providing a striking analogy to corresponding results in the theory of 2D Euler equations with bounded vorticity.
  • 10:45 - 11:00 am EDT
    Break
    Coffee Break - Virtual
  • 11:00 - 11:30 am EDT
    Hard spheres dynamics: weak vs strong collisions
    Virtual
    • Speaker
    • Denis Serre, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon
    • Session Chair
    • Alberto Bressan, The Pennsylvania State University
    Abstract
    Hard spheres dynamics is among the finest ones in the scale of models for gas dynamics. Before passing to the limit in order to derive a kinetic model, one needs to understand how many collisions take place, and how strong of weak they are. Collisions can be exponentially many in terms of the number $N$ of particles, but we prove that at most $O(N^2)$ among them can be significant.
  • 11:45 am - 1:30 pm EDT
    Lunch/Free Time
    Virtual
  • 1:30 - 2:00 pm EDT
    The Future of Front Tracking
    Virtual
    • Speaker
    • James Glimm, Stony Brook University
    • Session Chair
    • Gui-Qiang Chen, University of Oxford
    Abstract
    Solutions of the Navier-Stokes equation are not unique. We show that a maximum rate of entropy production is necessary admissibility condition to achieve a physical solution. For incompressible, constant density flow, the resulting solution is probably unique. For variable density flows, multiple distinct flow regimes are possible, and are determined by new physics added at the microscale. Front tracking has a role to enforce some examples of microphysical turbulent mixing regimes. A new multidimensional random choice method appears to be the ideal choice among competing sharp interface algorithms for this purpose.
  • 2:15 - 2:30 pm EDT
    Break
    Coffee Break - Virtual
  • 2:30 - 3:00 pm EDT
    Structure preserving numerical methods for hyperbolic conservation and balance laws
    Virtual
    • Speaker
    • Alina Chertock, North Carolina State University
    • Session Chair
    • Gui-Qiang Chen, University of Oxford
    Abstract
    Any physical models, while quite different in nature, can be described by nonlinear hyperbolic systems of conservation and balance laws. The main source of difficulties one comes across when numerically solving these systems is lack of smoothness as solutions of hyperbolic conservation/balance laws may develop very complicated nonlinear wave structures including shocks, rarefaction waves and contact discontinuities. The level of complexity may increase even further when solutions of the hyperbolic system reveal a multiscale character and/or the system includes additional terms such as friction terms, geometrical terms, nonconservative products, etc., which are needed to be taken into account in order to achieve a proper description of the studied physical phenomena. In such cases, it is extremely important to design a numerical method that is not only consistent with the given PDEs, but also preserves certain structural and asymptotic properties of the underlying problem at the discrete level. While a variety of numerical methods for such models have been successfully developed, there are still many open problems, for which the derivation of reliable high-resolution numerical methods still remains to be an extremely challenging task. In this talk, I will discuss recent advances in the development of two classes of structure preserving numerical methods for nonlinear hyperbolic systems of conservation and balance laws. In particular, I will present (i) well-balanced and positivity preserving numerical schemes, that is, the methods which are capable of exactly preserving some steady-state solutions as well as maintaining the positivity of the numerical quantities when it is required by the physical application, and (ii) asymptotic preserving schemes, which provide accurate and efficient numerical solutions in certain stiff and/or asymptotic regimes of physical interest.
  • 3:15 - 3:45 pm EDT
    Eulerian Lagrangian discontinuous Galerkin methods for nonlinear transport problems
    Virtual
    • Speaker
    • Jingmei Qiu, University of Delaware
    • Session Chair
    • Gui-Qiang Chen, University of Oxford
    Abstract
    We propose a new Eulerian-Lagrangian (EL) discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method formulated by introducing a modified adjoint problem for the test function and by performing the integration of PDE over a space-time region partitioned by time-dependent linear functions approximating characteristics. The error incurred in characteristics approximation in the modified adjoint problem can then be taken into account by a new flux term, and can be integrated by method-of-line Runge-Kutta (RK) methods. The ELDG framework is designed as a generalization of the semi-Lagrangian (SL) DG method and classical Eulerian RK DG method for linear advection problems. It takes advantages of both formulations. In the EL DG framework, characteristics are approximated by a linear function in time, thus shapes of upstream cells are quadrilaterals in general two-dimensional problems. No quadratic-curved quadrilaterals are needed to design higher than second order schemes as in the SL DG scheme. On the other hand, the time step constraint from a classical Eulerian RK DG method is greatly mitigated, as it is evident from our theoretical and numerical investigations. Connection of the proposed EL DG method with the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) DG is observed. Numerical results on linear transport problems, as well as the nonlinear Vlasov and incompressible Euler dynamics using the exponential RK time integrators, are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the ELDG method.
  • 4:00 - 5:00 pm EDT
    Gathertown Reception
    Reception - Virtual
Tuesday, May 18, 2021
  • 9:00 - 9:45 am EDT
    Gathertown Morning Coffee
    Coffee Break - Virtual
  • 10:00 - 10:30 am EDT
    Numerical methods for conservation laws on graphs
    Virtual
    • Speaker
    • Ulrik Fjordholm, University of Oslo
    • Session Chair
    • Constantine Dafermos, Brown University
    Abstract
    We consider a set of scalar conservation laws on a graph. Based on a choice of stationary states of the problem – analogous to the constants in Kruzkhov's entropy condition – we establish the uniqueness and stability of entropy solutions. For two classes of flux functions – either monotone or concave fluxes – we establish the convergence of an easy-to-implement Engquist–Osher-type finite volume method. This is joint work with Markus Musch and Nils Henrik Risebro (University of Oslo).
  • 10:45 - 11:00 am EDT
    Break
    Coffee Break - Virtual
  • 11:00 - 11:30 am EDT
    BV Solutions to a Hydrodynamic Limit of Flocking Type
    Virtual
    • Speaker
    • Cleopatra Christoforou, University of Cyprus
    • Session Chair
    • Constantine Dafermos, Brown University
    Abstract
    Mathematical models introduced to capture the emergent behavior of self-organized systems have brought new challenges in the mathematical community and a lot of attention in the recent years. Most studies on flocking models have been on the behavior of the particle model or the corresponding kinetic formulation and its hydrodynamic formulation that provides in the limit an Euler-type flocking system. This area has been investigated so far in the context of smooth solutions. In this talk, we will discuss a hydrodynamic model of flocking type in the setting of entropy weak solutions. We (i) establish global existence of entropy weak solutions for arbitrary initial data of bounded variation with finite mass confined in a bounded interval and uniformly positive density therein and (ii) show that the entropy solution admits time asymptotic flocking. This is a joint work with Debora Amadori from University of L’Aquila.
  • 11:45 am - 1:30 pm EDT
    Lunch/Free Time
    Virtual
  • 1:30 - 2:00 pm EDT
    Locally dissipative solutions of the Euler equations
    Virtual
    • Speaker
    • Camillo De Lellis, IAS
    • Session Chair
    • Fengyan Li, Rensselaer Polytechinic Institute
    Abstract
    The Onsager conjecture, recently solved by Phil Isett, states that, below a certain threshold regularity, Hoelder continuous solutions of the Euler equations might dissipate the kinetic energy. The original work of Onsager was motivated by the phenomenon of anomalous dissipation and a rigorous mathematical justification of the latter should show that the energy dissipation in the Navier-Stokes equations is, in a suitable statistical sense, independent of the viscosity. In particular it makes much more sense to look for solutions of the Euler equations which, besides dissipating the {\em total} kinetic energy, satisfy as well a suitable form of local energy inequality. Such solutions were first shown to exist by Laszlo Szekelyhidi Jr. and myself. In this talk I will review the methods used so far to approach their existence and the most recent results by Isett and by Hyunju Kwon and myself.
  • 2:15 - 2:30 pm EDT
    Break
    Coffee Break - Virtual
  • 2:30 - 3:00 pm EDT
    Shock reflection problems: existence, stability and regularity of global solutions
    Virtual
    • Speaker
    • Mikhail Feldman, University of Wisconsin
    • Session Chair
    • Fengyan Li, Rensselaer Polytechinic Institute
    Abstract
    In this talk we will start with discussion of shock reflection phenomena, and von Neumann conjectures on transition between regular and Mach reflections. Then we describe the results on existence, uniqueness, stability and regularity of global solutions to shock reflection for potential flow, and discuss the techniques. The approach is to reduce the shock reflection problem to a free boundary problem for a nonlinear elliptic equation in self-similar coordinates, with ellipticity degenerate near a part of the boundary. We will also discuss the open problems in the area.
  • 3:15 - 3:45 pm EDT
    Can the flow behind a weak-shock Mach reflection be shock-free?
    Virtual
    • Speaker
    • John Hunter, University of California Davis
    • Session Chair
    • Fengyan Li, Rensselaer Polytechinic Institute
    Abstract
    Numerical solutions of weak-shock Mach reflections show a sequence of supersonic patches and triple points in a tiny region below the leading triple point. A basic question, with analogs to the existence of shock-free flows over transonic airfoils, is whether it is possible to have only a single shock-free supersonic patch and triple point behind the Mach stem, or must there be multiple triple points. We explore this question using the steady transonic small disturbance equation as the simplest model equation. Assuming the hodograph transformation is invertible near the triple point, we formulate an oblique derivative Tricomi problem for the Tricomi equation as a local description of shock-free flows behind the Mach stem and discuss its solvability.
Wednesday, May 19, 2021
  • 9:00 - 9:45 am EDT
    Gathertown Morning Coffee
    Coffee Break - Virtual
  • 10:00 - 10:30 am EDT
    Asymptotical stability of wave patterns for viscous conservation laws under periodic perturbations
    Virtual
    • Speaker
    • Feimin Huang, Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences
    • Session Chair
    • Chi-Wang Shu, Brown University
    Abstract
    The asymptotical stability of wave patterns for viscous conservation laws is an interesting and important problem. Considerable progress on the stability of single shock wave, rarefaction wave in the whole space has been achieved in the past several decades. An interesting question is whether these wave patterns are still stable under periodic spatial perturbation. Compared with the stability problem in the whole space, the solution has no limit at the far fields. In this talk, I will present recent works on the stability of single shock wave and rarefaction wave for viscous conservation laws under periodic perturbations.
  • 10:45 - 11:00 am EDT
    Break
    Coffee Break - Virtual
  • 11:00 - 11:30 am EDT
    Obstacle problem, Euler system and turbulence
    Virtual
    • Speaker
    • Eduard Feireisl, Czech Academy of Sciences
    • Session Chair
    • Chi-Wang Shu, Brown University
    Abstract
    We consider a statistical limit of solutions to the compressible Navier--Stokes system in the high Reynolds number regime in a domain exterior to a rigid body. We investigate to what extent this highly turbulent regime can be modeled by an external stochastic perturbation, as suggested in the related physics literature.To this end, we interpret the statistical limit as a stochastic process on the associated trajectory space. We suppose that the limit process is statistically equivalent to a solution of the stochastic compressible Euler system.Then, necessarily,
    1. the stochastic forcing is not active -- the limit is a statistical solution of the deterministic Euler system;
    2. the solutions S--converge to the limit;
    3. if, in addition, the expected value of the limit process solves the Euler system, then the limit is deterministic and the convergence is strong a.a.
    These results strongly indicate that a stochastic forcing may not be a suitable model for turbulent randomness in compressible fluid flows.
  • 11:45 am - 1:30 pm EDT
    Lunch/Free Time
    Virtual
  • 1:30 - 2:30 pm EDT
    Poster Session
    Virtual
    Abstract
    Hyperbolicity-Preserving Well-Balanced Stochastic Galerkin Method for Shallow Water Equations
    Dihan Dai, University of Utah
    We study the stochastic Galerkin (SG) method for stochastic parameterized shallow water equations. Our work comprises the following aspects: (i) A hyperbolicity-preserving stochastic Galerkin formulation for the shallow water equations using only the conserved variables. (ii) A sufficient condition to preserve the hyperbolicity, which is a stochastic variant of the deterministic positivity condition. (iv) A computationally tractable condition to guarantee the hyperbolicity. (v) A central-upwind scheme that preserves both the hyperbolicity and the well-balanced property at discrete time levels.

    A new direct discontinuous Galerkin method with interface correction for compressible Navier-Stokes equations
    Mustafa Danis, Iowa State University
    We present a new direct discontinuous Galerkin method with interface correction (DDGIC) for solving 2-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The new approach is based on modeling the nonlinear diffusion of Navier-Stokes equations as a combination of multiple individual diffusion processes for each equation and conserved variable. This representation of nonlinear diffusion simplifies the numerical flux computation to a great extent since it only requires estimating the numerical flux for gradients of the conserved variables by the simple direct DG numerical flux formula. The new direct DG method is therefore easily extensible to the more general system of equations with nonlinear diffusion. We also demonstrate the high order of accuracy of the new DDGIC method and its ability to capture correct physics through numerical experiments.

    Sharp a-Contraction Estimates for Small Extremal Shocks
    William Golding, University of Texas at Austin
    In the case of systems of conservation laws, it is known that Kruzkov's contraction estimate may fail. However, when comparing an entropy solution to a shock, one may construct a weighted L^2 pseudo-distance, where one may recover the contraction property. In this poster, I will explain some recent work with Alexis Vasseur and Sam Krupa in which we show that the pseudo-distance can be constructed while maintaining precise control over the variation in the weight. This is a key ingredient in the work of Geng Chen, Sam Krupa, and Alexis Vasseur in showing that (for 2 x 2 systems) the conditions of Bressan et al. of Tame Oscillation and Bounded Variations along Space-like Curves are unnecessary for the uniqueness of small BV solutions.

    Entropy Methods for Gas Dynamics on Networks
    Yannick Holle, RWTH Aachen University
    We introduce new coupling conditions for isentropic flow on networks. The new coupling conditions can be derived from a kinetic model by imposing a condition on energy dissipation. Existence and uniqueness of solutions to the generalized Riemann and Cauchy problem are proven. The result for the generalized Riemann problem holds globally in state space. A numerical example is given in which the new conditions are the only known conditions leading to the physically correct wave types.

    Stability of a Nonlocal Conservation Law Modeling Traffic Flow
    Kuang Huang, Columbia University
    The emerging connected and automated vehicle technologies allow vehicles to perceive and process information in a wide spatial range, which motivates the modeling of traffic flow with nonlocal interactions. For example, conservation laws with nonlocal integral terms were considered in the literature. By conducting stability analysis of one such model, we obtain asymptotic stability of the uniform equilibrium flow under suitable assumptions on how the nonlocal information is utilized. Such results can shed light to the future design of driving algorithms for connected and automated vehicles.

    Shallow Water Models with Vertical Velocity Profiles
    Julian Koellermeier, KU Leuven
    Standard models for shallow water flows like the well-known shallow water equations assume a constant horizontal velocity that does not change in vertical direction. However, this is an unphysical assumption and can lead to wrong results in case of more complex flow fields. In this work, we present a model with vertical velocity profiles, that are expanded in a polynomial series using additional variables. This leads to a so-called moment model that leads to a more realistic description of the flow at the expense of additional equations. Unfortunately, the model equations are not hyperbolic in their original form, which can be mitigated by a hyperbolic regularization that allows to derive real eigenvalues analytically. Numerical tests show the convergence of the model towards reference solutions and a more realistic description of transport properties at the bottom, for example when sediment transport is considered. Further work considers the investigation of equilibrium states, the derivation of well-balancing numerical schemes, and the extension to more advances friction terms by means of a Savage-Hutter model.

    On an analytic solution to a 2-D PDE Type of an ideal fluid
    Evangelos Nastas, SUNY
    This PDE system, whose cardinality of equations exceeds that of its unknowns, is a 2-D equivalent of a general 3-D system, investigating a particular kind of a 2-D PDE of an ideal fluid. It delineates the thermal motion of poly-tropic gas with constant density. Isothermal gas motion with an adiabatic index different to the unit is reduced to the same system. Its study is less complicated in special Lagrangian coordinates. The resulting system consists of linear equations, solved analytically

    Adaptive Central-Upwind Scheme on Triangular Grids for the Saint-Venant System
    Thuong Nguyen, University of Utah
    Joint work with my advisor, Prof. Yekaterina Epshteyn In this work we develop a robust adaptive well-balanced and positivity-preserving central-upwind scheme on unstructured triangular grids for shallow water equations. The numerical method is an extension of the scheme from [Liu et al,J. of Comp. Phys, 374 (2018), pp. 213 - 236]. As a part of the adaptive central-upwind algorithm, we obtain local a posteriori error estimator for the efficient mesh refinement strategy. The accuracy, high-resolution and efficiency of new adaptive central upwind scheme are demonstrated on a number of challenging tests for shallow water models.

    Physics-informed Machine Learning of Collective Behaviors
    Ming Zhong, Johns Hopkins University
    Collective behaviors (clustering, flocking, milling, etc.) are among the most interesting and challenging phenomena to understanding from the mathematical point of view. We offer a non-parametric and physics-based learning approach to discover the governing structure, i.e. the interaction functions between agents, of collective dynamics from observation of the trajectory data. Our learning approach can aid in validating and improving the modeling of collective dynamics.
    Having established the convergent properties of our learning approach, we investigate the steady state behavior of the learned dynamics evolved using the estimators inferred from observation data. We then apply our extended learning approach to study the celestial motion of the Solar system using the NASA JPL's modern Ephemeris. We are able to reproduce trajectory data with a precession rate of 558'' per Earth-century for Mercury's orbit. Compared to Newton's theoretical 532'' rate and the observed 575'' rate, we are able to learn portion of the general relativity effect directly from the data. Convergence properties of the extended learning approaches on second-order models are analyzed. Learning collective dynamics on non-Euclidean manifolds has been developed and discussed.

  • 2:30 - 3:00 pm EDT
    Devising energy-conserving finite element methods for wave propagation
    Virtual
    • Speaker
    • Bernardo Cockburn, University of Minnesota
    • Session Chair
    • Eitan Tadmor, University of Maryland
    Abstract
    Discontinuous Galerkin methods for the wave equation are typically defined by using the fact that the equation can be expressed as a symmetric hyperbolic system. Although these methods can be devised to be high-order accurate, they are naturally dissipative and cannot be used for long-time simulations. We show that it is possible, by taking advantage of the Hamiltonian structure of the wave equation, to overcome this drawback and obtain Discontinuous Galerkin (and other finite element) methods which maintain their original high-order accuracy while conserving the discrete space-discretization energy. We sketch the extension of this approach to other systems of equations with Hamiltonian structure including equations modeling linear and nonlinear elastic, electromagnetic and water wave equations.
  • 3:15 - 3:30 pm EDT
    Break
    Coffee Break - Virtual
  • 3:30 - 4:00 pm EDT
    High Order Unconditionally Strong Stability Preserving Multi-Derivative Implicit and Imex Runge–Kutta Methods with Asymptotic Preserving Properties
    Virtual
    • Speaker
    • Sigal Gottlieb, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth
    • Session Chair
    • Eitan Tadmor, University of Maryland
    Abstract
    In this talk we present a class of high order unconditionally strong stability preserving (SSP) implicit multi-derivative Runge–Kutta schemes, and SSP implicit-explicit (IMEX) multi-derivative Runge–Kutta schemes where the time-step restriction is independent of the stiff term. The unconditional SSP property for a method of order p > 2 is unique among SSP methods, and depends on a backward-in-time assumption on the derivative of the operator. We show that this backward derivative condition is satisfied in many relevant cases where SSP IMEX schemes are desired. We devise unconditionally SSP implicit Runge–Kutta schemes of order up to p = 4, and IMEX Runge–Kutta schemes of order up to p = 3. For the multi-derivative IMEX schemes, we also derive and present the order conditions, which have not appeared previously. The unconditional SSP condition ensures that these methods are positivity preserving, and we present sufficient conditions under which such methods are also asymptotic preserving when applied to a range of problems, including a hyperbolic relaxation system, the Broadwell model, and the Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) kinetic equation. We present numerical results to support the theoretical results, on a variety of problems.
Thursday, May 20, 2021
  • 9:00 - 9:45 am EDT
    Gathertown Morning Coffee
    Coffee Break - Virtual
  • 10:00 - 10:30 am EDT
    Shock Waves and Entropy
    Virtual
    • Speaker
    • Tai-Ping Liu, Stanford University
    • Session Chair
    • Konstantina Trivisa, University of Maryland
    Abstract
    It was recognized soon after the pioneering works of Riemann and Stokes in the mid-nineteenth century that entropy increases as the gas flows across a shock wave for polyatomic gases. Around 1940's Bethe and Weyl independently formulated the convexity condition for the equivalence of the compressibility of a shock and the entropy increase across it. This was subsequently generalized to the general system of hyperbolic conservation laws by Lax. The situation without convexity is interesting. The Russian school of Oleinik and Krushkov obtained complete results for scalar laws. It is understood now that the existence of entropy for a system is a constitutive hypothesis. Godunov established the relation between the existence of entropy and the symmetric structure of a system. There have been efforts to relate the admissibility conditions for shock waves to the entropy production. For this, we offer a definitive result for shock waves in the Euler equations for compressible media. In this talk, we will survey the historical developments on general systems as well as some exact analysis for the Euler equations.
  • 10:30 - 10:35 am EDT
    Group Photo
    Virtual
  • 10:45 - 11:00 am EDT
    Break
    Coffee Break - Virtual
  • 11:00 - 11:30 am EDT
    The nonlinear stability of Schwarzschild black holes in general relativity
    Virtual
    • Speaker
    • Mihalis Dafermos, Princeton University
    • Session Chair
    • Konstantina Trivisa, University of Maryland
  • 11:45 am - 1:30 pm EDT
    Lunch/Free Time
    Virtual
  • 1:30 - 2:00 pm EDT
    Variations on the theme of scalar conservation laws
    Virtual
    • Speaker
    • Wen Shen, The Pennsylvania State University
    • Session Chair
    • Dehua Wang, University of Pittsburgh
    Abstract
    In this talk we visit several variations of a standard conservation law. These include the cases such as: (i) the flux function is discontinuous in space and time, (ii) the flux function is nonlocal and contains an integral term, and (iii) combinations of them. We discuss key challenges, some recent results, and applications to traffic flow.
  • 2:15 - 2:30 pm EDT
    Break
    Coffee Break - Virtual
  • 2:30 - 3:00 pm EDT
    On the Dynamics of Ferrofluids: Weak Solutions and Relaxation Limit for the Rosensweig Model
    Virtual
    • Speaker
    • Franziska Weber, Carnegie Mellon University
    • Session Chair
    • Dehua Wang, University of Pittsburgh
    Abstract
    We show existence of global weak solutions of the Rosensweig model of ferrofluids, using DiPerna-Lions’ theory of compressible fluids. Then, we investigate the relaxation to equilibrium ϵ→0 using the relative entropy method. If the limiting system has a Lipschitz continuous solution, we can show a convergence rate in ϵ, if the limiting system has only a weak solution, we obtain strong convergence of a subsequence in L^2.
  • 3:15 - 3:45 pm EDT
    Arbitrary order structure preserving discontinuous Galerkin methods for hyperbolic balance laws
    Virtual
    • Speaker
    • Yulong Xing, The Ohio State University
    • Session Chair
    • Dehua Wang, University of Pittsburgh
    Abstract
    Euler equations under gravitational fields and shallow water equations with a non-flat bottom topography are two prototype hyperbolic conservation laws with source term (also referred as hyperbolic balance laws). They both have various applications in many fields. In this presentation, we will talk about arbitrary order structure preserving discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods which can exactly capture the non-trivial steady state solutions of these models, and at the same time maintain the non-negativity of some physical quantities. Numerical tests are provided to verify the well-balanced property, positivity-preserving property, high-order accuracy, and good resolution for both smooth and discontinuous solutions.
  • 4:00 - 5:00 pm EDT
    Virtual Free Discussion
    Problem Session - Virtual
Friday, May 21, 2021
  • 9:00 - 9:45 am EDT
    Gathertown Morning Coffee
    Coffee Break - Virtual
  • 10:00 - 10:30 am EDT
    On the singular local limit for conservation laws with nonlocal fluxes
    Virtual
    • Speaker
    • Laura Spinolo, IMATI-CNR
    • Session Chair
    • Mikhail Feldman, University of Wisconsin
    Abstract
    Conservation laws with nonlocal fluxes have recently drawn considerable attention owing to their applications to several engineering problems, like models of vehicular and pedestrian traffic. They consist of conservation laws where the flux function depends on the convolution of the solution with a given kernel. In the singular local limit where the convolution kernel is replaced by a Dirac delta, one formally recovers a (classical) conservation law. In this talk I will overview recent progress on the rigorous justification of this nonlocal-to-local limit. I will mention counter-examples showing that, in general, the solutions of the nonlocal problems do not converge to the entropy admissible solution of the conservation law. On the other hand, the nonlocal-to-local limit have been recently justified, under different assumptions, in the case of anisotropic convolution kernels, which are natural in view of applications to models of vehicular traffic. The talk will be based on joint works with Maria Colombo, Gianluca Crippa and Elio Marconi.
  • 10:45 - 11:00 am EDT
    Break
    Coffee Break - Virtual
  • 11:00 - 11:30 am EDT
    Fast computations of high order WENO methods for hyperbolic conservation laws
    Virtual
    • Speaker
    • Yongtao Zhang, University of Notre Dame
    • Session Chair
    • Mikhail Feldman, University of Wisconsin
    Abstract
    Weighted essentially non-oscillatory (WENO) schemes are a popular class of high order accurate numerical methods for solving hyperbolic conservation laws. They have been applied extensively in computational fluid dynamics and other scientific problems. However, for complicated multidimensional problems, it often leads to large amount of operations and computational costs in the numerical simulations by using nonlinear high order accuracy WENO schemes such as fifth order WENO schemes. How to achieve fast simulations by high order WENO methods for solving hyperbolic conservation laws is a challenging and important question. In this talk, I shall present our recent work on applying fast sweeping methods and sparse-grid techniques for efficient computations of WENO schemes. Fast sweeping methods are a class of efficient iterative methods for solving steady state problems of hyperbolic PDEs. They utilize alternating sweeping strategy to cover a family of characteristics in a certain direction simultaneously in each sweeping order. Coupled with the Gauss-Seidel iterations, these methods can achieve a fast convergence speed for computations of steady state solutions of hyperbolic PDEs. We design absolutely convergent fixed-point fast sweeping WENO methods for solving steady state solutions of hyperbolic conservation laws. For high-dimensional problems, sparse-grid techniques are efficient approximation tools to reduce degrees of freedom in the discretizations. We apply the sparse-grid combination technique to fifth order WENO finite difference schemes for solving time dependent hyperbolic PDEs defined on high spatial dimension domains. Extensive numerical experiments shall be shown to demonstrate large savings of computational costs by comparing with simulations using traditional methods for solving hyperbolic conservation laws.
  • 11:45 am - 1:15 pm EDT
    Lunch/Free Time
    Virtual
  • 1:15 - 1:45 pm EDT
    Coupled parabolic-hyperbolic moving boundary problems in poroelasticity
    Virtual
    • Speaker
    • Suncica Canic, University of Houston
    • Session Chair
    • Sigal Gottlieb, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth
    Abstract
    We address certain challenges related to the analysis of moving boundary problems of parabolic-hyperbolic type. In particular, we focus on a fluid-structure interaction problem between the flow of an incompressible, viscous fluid and a multi-layered poroelastic structure, which behaves as a compressible material. The coupled problem is described by the time dependent Stokes equations, which are coupled to the Biot equations over a poroelastic plate serving as an interface between the free fluid flow and the poroelastic structure. This problem was motivated by the design of a first bioartificial pancreas without the need for immunosuppressant therapy. We will show a recent constructive existence proof for a weak solution to this problem, and a (weak-strong) uniqueness result. This is one of only a handful of well-posedness results in the area of fluid-poroelastic structure interaction problems. The mathematical reasons for this will be discussed, and the impact on the design of a bioartificial pancreas will be shown.
  • 2:00 - 2:15 pm EDT
    Break
    Coffee Break - Virtual
  • 2:15 - 2:45 pm EDT
    Stability of discontinuous solutions for inviscid compressible flows
    Virtual
    • Speaker
    • Alexis Vasseur, University of Texas at Austin
    • Session Chair
    • Sigal Gottlieb, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth
    Abstract
    We will discuss some recent developments of the theory of a contraction with shifts to study the stability of discontinuous solutions of systems of equations modeling inviscid compressible flows. In a first result, in collaboration with Geng Chen and Sam Krupa, we provide some extensions of the Bressan theory for uniqueness of BV solutions in 1D. We show that for 2 × 2 systems, the technical condition, known as bounded variations on space- like curve, is not needed for the uniqueness result. Moreover, we extend the result to a weak/BV stability result (in the spirit of the weak/strong principle of Dafermos) allowing wild perturbations fulfilling only the so-called strong trace property. In a second work in collaboration with Moon-Jin Kang, we consider the stability of 1D viscous shocks for the compressible Navier-Stokes equation, uniformly with respect to the viscosity (JEMS 21'). Thanks to the uniformity with respect to the viscosity, the result can be extended to the Euler equation (the associated inviscid model).This provides a stability result which holds in the class of wild perturbations of inviscid limits of solutions to Navier-Stokes, without any regularity restriction, not even the strong trace property (Inventiones 21'). This shows that the class of inviscid limits of Navier-Stokes equations is better behaved that the class of weak solutions to the inviscid limit problem. Finally, we will present a first multi-D result obtained with Moon-Jin Kang and Yi Wang. We show the stability of contact discontinuities without shear, in the class of inviscid limits of compressible Fourier-Navier-Stokes equation. Note that it is still unknown whether non-uniqueness results can be obtained via convex integration for this special kind of singularity.
  • 3:00 - 3:30 pm EDT
    Conservation Laws in Biology: Two New Examples
    Virtual
    • Speaker
    • Marshall Slemrod, University of Wisconsin
    • Session Chair
    • Sigal Gottlieb, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth
    Abstract
    This talk is based on a paper with Matan Mussel ( NIH) that will appear in QAM. The talk provides two new applications of conservation laws in biology. The first is the application of the van der Waals fluid formalism for action potentials. The second is the application of the conservation laws of differential geometry (Gauss–Codazzi equations) to produce non-smooth surfaces representing Endoplasmic Reticulum sheets.

All event times are listed in ICERM local time in Providence, RI (Eastern Daylight Time / UTC-4).

All event times are listed in .

Poster Session Gallery

Hyperbolicity-Preserving Well-Balanced Stochastic Galerkin Method for Shallow Water Equations

Dihan Dai

A new direct discontinuous Galerkin method with interface correction for compressible Navier-Stokes equations

Mustafa Danis

Sharp a-Contraction Estimates for Small Extremal Shocks

William Golding

Entropy Methods for Gas Dynamics on Networks

Yannick Holle

Stability of a Nonlocal Conservation Law Modeling Traffic Flow

Kuang Huang

Shallow Water Models with Vertical Velocity Pro les

Julian Koellermeier

Physics-informedMachineLearning of Collective Behaviors

Zhong Ming

On an Analytic Solution to a 2-D PDE Type of an Ideal Fluid

Evangelos Nastas

Adaptive Central-Upwind Scheme on Triangular Grids for the Saint-Venant System

Thuong Nguyen

Convergence of strong shock waves in a non-ideal gas

Amit Tomar

Request Reimbursement

ORCID iD
As this program is funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), ICERM is required to collect your ORCID iD if you are receiving funding to attend this program. Be sure to add your ORCID iD to your Cube profile as soon as possible to avoid delaying your reimbursement.
Acceptable Costs
  • 1 roundtrip between your home institute and ICERM
  • Flights on U.S. or E.U. airlines – economy class to either Providence airport (PVD) or Boston airport (BOS)
  • Ground Transportation to and from airports and ICERM.
Unacceptable Costs
  • Flights on non-U.S. or non-E.U. airlines
  • Flights on U.K. airlines
  • Seats in economy plus, business class, or first class
  • Change ticket fees of any kind
  • Multi-use bus passes
  • Meals or incidentals
Advance Approval Required
  • Personal car travel to ICERM from outside New England
  • Multiple-destination plane ticket; does not include layovers to reach ICERM
  • Arriving or departing from ICERM more than a day before or day after the program
  • Multiple trips to ICERM
  • Rental car to/from ICERM
  • Flights on a Swiss, Japanese, or Australian airlines
  • Arriving or departing from airport other than PVD/BOS or home institution's local airport
  • 2 one-way plane tickets to create a roundtrip (often purchased from Expedia, Orbitz, etc.)
Reimbursement Requests

Request Reimbursement with Cube

Refer to the back of your ID badge for more information. Checklists are available at the front desk and in the Reimbursement section of Cube.

Reimbursement Tips
  • Scanned original receipts are required for all expenses
  • Airfare receipt must show full itinerary and payment
  • ICERM does not offer per diem or meal reimbursement
  • Allowable mileage is reimbursed at prevailing IRS Business Rate and trip documented via pdf of Google Maps result
  • Keep all documentation until you receive your reimbursement!
Reimbursement Timing

6 - 8 weeks after all documentation is sent to ICERM. All reimbursement requests are reviewed by numerous central offices at Brown who may request additional documentation.

Reimbursement Deadline

Submissions must be received within 30 days of ICERM departure to avoid applicable taxes. Submissions after thirty days will incur applicable taxes. No submissions are accepted more than six months after the program end.