Organizing Committee
Abstract

The adoption of D-module techniques has transformed the interface between commutative algebra and algebraic geometry over the last two decades. The discovery of interactions and parallels with the Frobenius morphism has been an impetus for many new results, including new invariants attached to singularities but also D- and F-module based algorithms for computing quantities that used to be unattainable.

Our goal for this workshop is to discuss computational aspects and new challenges in singularity theory, focusing on special varieties that arise from group actions, canonical maps, or universal constructions. By bringing together geometers, algebraists, and invariant theorists, we will address problems from multiple perspectives. These will include comparisons of composition chains for D- and F-modules, the impact of group actions on singularity invariants, and the structure of differential operators on singularities in varying characteristics.

Confirmed Speakers & Participants

  • Speaker
  • Poster Presenter
  • Attendee
  • Virtual Attendee
  • Zainab Al-Maamari
    Sultan Qaboos University
  • Josep Àlvarez Montaner
    Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya
  • Daniel Bath
    KU Leuven
  • Christine Berkesch
    University of Minnesota
  • Neelima Borade
    Princeton University
  • Mireille Boutin
    Purdue University
  • Anna Brosowsky
    University of Michigan
  • Yairon Cid-Ruiz
    Ghent University
  • SUTIRTHA DATTA
    Chennai Mathematical Institute
  • Bradley Dirks
    University of Michigan
  • Shanna Dobson
    University of California at Riverside
  • Florian Enescu
    Georgia State University
  • Eleonore Faber
    University of Leeds
  • Eloísa Grifo
    University of Nebraska -- Lincoln
  • Justin Hilburn
    Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics
  • Mee Seong Im
    United States Naval Academy
  • Jack Jeffries
    University of Nebraska-Lincoln
  • Minyoung Jeon
    The Ohio State University
  • Seung-Jo Jung
    Jeonbuk National University
  • Moty Katzman
    University of Sheffield
  • Jennifer Kenkel
    University of Michigan
  • Adam LaClair
    Purdue University
  • Jonghyun Lee
    University of Michigan
  • Xiaobin Li
    Southwest Jiaotong University
  • András Lőrincz
    Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin
  • Gennady Lyubeznik
    University of Minnesota,
  • Linquan Ma
    Purdue University
  • Saikat Maity
    University of Calcutta
  • Devlin Mallory
    University of Michigan
  • Jason McCullough
    Iowa State University
  • Claudia Miller
    Syracuse University
  • Mircea Mustaţă
    University of Michigan
  • Swaraj Pande
    University of Michigan
  • Vaibhav Pandey
    University of Utah
  • Michael Perlman
    Queen's University
  • Sasha Pevzner
    University of Minnesota, Twin Cities
  • Claudia Polini
    University of Notre Dame
  • Zhijun (George) Qiao
    University of Texas Rio Grande Valley
  • Eamon Quinlan-Gallego
    University of Michigan
  • Rebecca R.G.
    George Mason University
  • Claudiu Raicu
    University of Notre Dame
  • Thomas Reichelt
    Universität Heidelberg
  • Sudeshna Roy
    Chennai Mathematical Institute
  • Noussaiba Saadoudi
    UMBB & USTHB
  • Afshan Sadiq
    University of Sussex
  • Anurag Singh
    University of Utah
  • JYOTI SINGH
    VNIT, Nagpur
  • Ilya Smirnov
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology
  • Karen Smith
    University of Michigan
  • Avi Steiner
    University Of Western Ontario
  • Sheng Tan
    Purdue University
  • Grisha Taroyan
    NRU HSE
  • Will Traves
    United States Naval Academy
  • Keller VandeBogert
    Notre Dame University
  • Janet Vassilev
    University of New Mexico
  • Duc Vo
    Harvard University
  • Joe Waldron
    Michigan State University
  • Uli Walther
    Purdue University
  • Botong Wang
    University of Wisconsin
  • Yinan Wang
    University of Michigan
  • Emily Witt
    University of Kansas
  • Lei Wu
    KU Leuven
  • Wenliang Zhang
    University of Illinois at Chicago

Workshop Schedule

Monday, August 9, 2021
  • 9:45 - 10:00 am EDT
    Welcome
    Virtual
    • Brendan Hassett, ICERM/Brown University
  • 10:00 - 10:40 am EDT
    On the Hodge filtration on local cohomology
    Virtual
    • Speaker
    • Mircea Mustaţă, University of Michigan
    • Session Chair
    • Uli Walther, Purdue University
    Abstract
    The local cohomology sheaf of a smooth complex variety along a closed subvariety comes endowed with a Hodge filtration, via Saito's theory of mixed Hodge modules. I will discuss some properties of this filtration, based on joint work with Mihnea Popa.
  • 10:50 - 11:00 am EDT
    Break
    Coffee Break - Virtual
  • 11:00 - 11:40 am EDT
    Extremal Singularities in Positive Characteristic
    Virtual
    • Speaker
    • Karen Smith, University of Michigan
    • Session Chair
    • Uli Walther, Purdue University
    Abstract
    What is the most singular possible singularity? What can we say about its geometric and algebraic properties? This seemingly naive question has a sensible answer in characteristic p. The ""F-pure threshold,"" which is an analog of the log canonical threshold, can be used to ""measure"" how bad a singularity is. The F-pure threshold is a numerical invariant of a point on (say) a hypersurface---a positive rational number that is 1 at any smooth point (or more generally, any F-pure point) but less than one in general, with ""more singular"" points having smaller F-pure thresholds. We explain a recently proved lower bound on the F-pure threshold in terms of the multiplicity of the singularity. We also show that there is a nice class of hypersurfaces--which we call ""Extremal hypersurfaces""---for which this bound is achieved. These have very nice (extreme!) geometric properties. For example, the affine cone over a non Frobenius split cubic surface of characteristic two is one example of an ""extremal singularity"". Geometrically, these are the only cubic surfaces with the property that *every* triple of coplanar lines on the surface meets in a single point (rather than a ""triangle"" as expected)--a very extreme property indeed.
  • 11:50 am - 1:00 pm EDT
    Lunch/Free Time
    Virtual
  • 1:00 - 1:40 pm EDT
    Pure subrings of polynomial rings
    Virtual
    • Speaker
    • Anurag Singh, University of Utah
    • Session Chair
    • Uli Walther, Purdue University
    Abstract
    Let G be a linearly reductive group over a field K, with a linear action on a polynomial ring over K. Then the invariant ring is a pure subring of the polynomial ring; many key properties of classical invariant rings including finite generation and the Cohen-Macaulay property, as in the Hochster-Roberts theorem, follow from purity. Now let A denote either a field, or the ring of integers, or a ring of p-adic integers. When is a given finitely generated A-algebra a pure subring of a polynomial ring over A? We will discuss how this can be addressed via D-modules, Group Actions, and Frobenius! The recent Computing on Singularities is joint work with Jack Jeffries.
  • 1:50 - 2:00 pm EDT
    Break
    Coffee Break - Virtual
  • 2:00 - 2:40 pm EDT
    Primary decomposition with differential operators
    Virtual
    • Yairon Cid-Ruiz, Ghent University
    Abstract
    We introduce differential primary decompositions for ideals in a commutative ring. Ideal membership is characterized by differential conditions. The minimal number of conditions needed is the arithmetic multiplicity. Minimal differential primary decompositions are unique up to change of bases. Our results generalize the construction of Noetherian operators for primary ideals in the analytic theory of Ehrenpreis- Palamodov, and they offer a concise method for representing affine schemes. The case of modules is also addressed. This is joint work with Bernd Sturmfels.
  • 3:00 - 5:00 pm EDT
    Gathertown Afternoon Coffee
    Coffee Break - Virtual
Tuesday, August 10, 2021
  • 10:00 - 10:40 am EDT
    Non-abelian transformations
    Virtual
    • Speaker
    • Botong Wang, University of Wisconsin
    • Session Chair
    • Claudiu Raicu, University of Notre Dame
    Abstract
    As the constructible counterpart of the Fourier-Mukai transformation, the non-abelian Mellin transformation of a constructible complex can be considered as taking the hyper-cohomology of the complex twisted by all possible local systems simultaneously. We will explain a t-exactness result about the non-abelian Mellin transformation, generalizing a theorem of Gabber-Loeser on affine torus. We will also discuss some local vanishing properties of the Sabbah's specialization functor, which is a key step in the proof of the t-exactness result.
  • 10:50 - 11:00 am EDT
    Break
    Coffee Break - Virtual
  • 11:00 - 11:40 am EDT
    Bernstein's inequality and holonomicity for certain singular rings
    Virtual
    • Speaker
    • Jack Jeffries, University of Nebraska-Lincoln
    • Session Chair
    • Claudiu Raicu, University of Notre Dame
    Abstract
    We prove the Bernstein inequality and develop the theory of holonomic D-modules for rings of invariants of finite groups in characteristic zero, and for strongly F-regular finitely generated graded algebras with FFRT in prime characteristic. In each of these cases, the ring itself, its localizations, and its local cohomology modules are holonomic. We also show that holonomic D-modules, in this context, have finite length. This is based on joint work with Josep Àlvarez Montaner, Daniel J. Hernández, Luis Núñez-Betancourt, Pedro Teixeira, and Emily E. Witt.
  • 11:50 am - 1:00 pm EDT
    Lunch/Free Time
    Virtual
  • 1:00 - 1:40 pm EDT
    TBA
    Virtual
    • Speaker
    • Mireille Boutin, Purdue University
    • Session Chair
    • Claudiu Raicu, University of Notre Dame
  • 1:50 - 2:00 pm EDT
    Break
    Coffee Break - Virtual
  • 2:00 - 3:00 pm EDT
    Problem Session
    Virtual
  • 3:00 - 5:00 pm EDT
    Gathertown Afternoon Coffee
    Coffee Break - Virtual
Wednesday, August 11, 2021
  • 10:00 - 10:40 am EDT
    Bernstein-Sato ideals and Riemann-Hilbert correspondence for Alexander complexes
    Virtual
    • Speaker
    • Lei Wu, KU Leuven
    • Session Chair
    • Linquan Ma, Purdue University
    Abstract
    Using V-filtrations, Kashiwara and Malgrange constructed Riemann-Hilbert correspondence for nearby and vanishing cycles along a single holomorphic functions. Sabbah then constructed multi V-filtrations along a finite set of holomorphic functions and thus obtained the multivariate Bernstein-Sato polynomials. However, Sabbah's method also indicates that the method of Kashiwara and Malgrange can not be generalized to the multivariate case in general. In this talk, first I will explain the construction of Bernstein-Sato ideals and Alexander complexes by using Mellin transformations. Then, I will focus on the construction of Riemann-Hilbert correspondence for Alexander complexes (the multivariate generalization of nearby cycles) by using Bernstein-Sato ideals and relative holonomic D-modules.
  • 10:50 - 11:00 am EDT
    Break
    Coffee Break - Virtual
  • 11:00 - 11:40 am EDT
    Characteristic-free definition of holonomicity
    Virtual
    • Speaker
    • Gennady Lyubeznik, University of Minnesota,
    • Session Chair
    • Linquan Ma, Purdue University
    Abstract
    Most of the theory of D-modules has been developed only in characteristic zero. This includes holonomic modules. Some candidates for holonomic modules in characteristic p>0 have been proposed using definitions specific to characteristic p>0. The first characteristic-free definition of holonomicity was given in 2010 by the speaker, but only for modules over polynomial rings. In the talk I am going to describe an extension of this definition to arbitrary non-singular varieties. This is joint work with Wenliang Zhang.
  • 11:50 am - 1:00 pm EDT
    Lunch/Free Time
    Virtual
  • 1:00 - 1:40 pm EDT
    Studying singularities using closure operations
    Virtual
    • Speaker
    • Rebecca R.G., George Mason University
    • Session Chair
    • Linquan Ma, Purdue University
    Abstract
    A number of the innovations used in studying singularities in commutative algebra have come from the study of tight closure and its test ideal in rings of equal characteristic. In replicating these results in rings of mixed characteristic, it has been useful to find closure operations that share key properties with tight closure. By studying the shared structure of common closure operations in commutative algebra, we show that many tight closure properties, in particular the structure of the test ideal, hold for a much larger set of closure operations, including (big Cohen-Macaulay) module closures and mixed characteristic closures. In this talk, I will describe the structures that these closure operations have in common and share some of the results on test ideals that have come out of this theory. Parts of this research are joint with subsets of Neil Epstein, Janet Vassilev, Felipe Pérez, and Zhan Jiang.
  • 1:50 - 2:00 pm EDT
    Break
    Coffee Break - Virtual
  • 2:00 - 3:00 pm EDT
    Lightning Talks
    Virtual
  • 3:00 - 5:00 pm EDT
    Gathertown Afternoon Coffee
    Coffee Break - Virtual
Thursday, August 12, 2021
  • 10:00 - 10:40 am EDT
    Computing with equivariant D-modules
    Virtual
    • Speaker
    • András Lőrincz, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin
    • Session Chair
    • Claudia Miller, Syracuse University
    Abstract
    In this talk, I will discuss some results and tools concerning equivariant D-modules, with a focus on representations of reductive groups having finitely many orbits. In particular, I provide explicit descriptions of: categories of equivariant D-modules as quivers, D-module structures of local cohomology modules supported in orbit closures, Lyubeznik numbers, Bernstein-Sato polynomials of holonomic functions, character formulas.
  • 10:50 - 11:00 am EDT
    Break
    Coffee Break - Virtual
  • 11:00 - 11:40 am EDT
    Symbolic powers in mixed characteristic
    Virtual
    • Speaker
    • Eloísa Grifo, University of Nebraska -- Lincoln
    • Session Chair
    • Claudia Miller, Syracuse University
    Abstract
    In a polynomial ring over a perfect field, the symbolic powers of a radical ideal consist of the polynomials that vanish to order n on the corresponding variety, and can be described via differential operators. If we replace the field with a DVR, we need both differential operators and Joyal and Buium's notion of a p-derivation to give an analogous result. As an application, we will discuss an explicit Chevalley lemma for the symbolic powers of prime ideals in direct summands of polynomial rings. This is joint work with Alessandro De Stefani and Jack Jeffries.
  • 11:50 am - 1:00 pm EDT
    Lunch/Free Time
    Virtual
  • 1:00 - 1:40 pm EDT
    Asymptotic vanishing of local cohomology modules
    Virtual
    • Speaker
    • Wenliang Zhang, University of Illinois at Chicago
    • Session Chair
    • Claudia Miller, Syracuse University
    Abstract
    In this talk, I will survey some recent results on asymptotic vanishing of cohomology of lci varieties and explain an approach to extending these results to graded rings over a field. If time permits, I will explain an application of our approach to the study of rings of prime characteristic.
  • 2:00 - 3:00 pm EDT
    TBD
    - Virtual
  • 3:00 - 5:00 pm EDT
    Gathertown Afternoon Coffee
    Coffee Break - Virtual
Friday, August 13, 2021
  • 10:00 - 10:40 am EDT
    Multiplicity sequences
    Virtual
    • Speaker
    • Claudia Polini, University of Notre Dame
    • Session Chair
    • Christine Berkesch, University of Minnesota
    Abstract
    I will report on joint work with Trung, Ulrich, and Validashti
  • 10:50 - 11:00 am EDT
    Break
    Coffee Break - Virtual
  • 11:00 - 11:40 am EDT
    (Irregular) Hodge theory of GKZ systems
    Virtual
    • Speaker
    • Thomas Reichelt, Universität Heidelberg
    • Session Chair
    • Christine Berkesch, University of Minnesota
    Abstract
    GKZ hypergeometric systems were introduced by Gelfand, Kapranov and Zelevinsky as a generalization of Gauss hypergeometric differential equation. It can be shown that for certain parameters the GKZ-systems carry the structure of an irregular mixed Hodge module, a category recently defined by Claude Sabbah. We will discuss the Hodge and weight filtration of these D-modules.
  • 11:50 am - 1:00 pm EDT
    Lunch/Free Time
    Virtual
  • 1:00 - 1:40 pm EDT
    TBA
    Virtual
    • Speaker
    • Emily Witt, University of Kansas
    • Session Chair
    • Christine Berkesch, University of Minnesota
  • 1:50 - 2:00 pm EDT
    Break
    Coffee Break - Virtual
  • 2:00 - 3:00 pm EDT
    Problem Session
    Virtual
  • 3:00 - 5:00 pm EDT
    Gathertown Afternoon Coffee
    Coffee Break - Virtual

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All event times are listed in .

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