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ICERM Semester Program on "High-dimensional Approximation"
(September 8, 2014 - December 5, 2014)

CLICK HERE TO PARTICIPATE
Review of applications will begin on March 15, 2014
Organizing Committee

Introduction

The fundamental problem of approximation theory is to resolve a possibly complicated function, called the target function, by simpler, easier to compute functions called approximants. Increasing the resolution of the target function can generally only be achieved by increasing the complexity of the approximants. The understanding of this trade-off between resolution and complexity is the main goal of approximation theory, a classical subject that goes back to the early results on Taylor's and Fourier's expansions of a function.

Modern problems in approximation, driven by applications in biology, medicine, and engineering, are being formulated in very high dimensions, which brings to the fore new phenomena. One aspect of the high-dimensional regime is a focus on sparse signals, motivated by the fact that many real world signals can be well approximated by sparse ones. The goal of compressed sensing is to reconstruct such signals from their incomplete linear information. Another aspect of this regime is the "curse of dimensionality" for standard smoothness classes, which means that the complexity of approximation depends exponentially on dimension. An important step in solving multivariate problems with large dimension has been made in the last 20 years: sparse representations are used as a way to model the corresponding function classes. This approach automatically entails a need for nonlinear approximation, and greedy approximation, in particular.

This program addresses a broad spectrum of approximation problems, from the approximation of functions in norm, to numerical integration, to computing minima, with a focus on sharp error estimates. It will explore the rich connections to the theory of distributions of point-sets in both Euclidean settings and on manifolds and to the computational complexity of continuous problems. It will address the issues of design of algorithms and of numerical experiments. The program will attract researchers in approximation theory, compressed sensing, optimization theory, discrepancy theory, and information based complexity theory.



**Long-Term Participants
View in-residence dates for long-term visitors
  • Aaron Adcock **
    (Stanford University)
  • Ali Ahmed **
    (Georgia Institute of Technology)
  • Christoph Aistleitner
    (Technische Universität Graz)
  • Akram Aldroubi
    (Vanderbilt University)
  • Ulas Ayaz **
    (Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn)
  • Marcus Bachmayr
    (RWTH Aachen)
  • Afonso Bandeira **
    (Princeton University)
  • Nikhil Bansal
    (Technische Universiteit Eindhoven)
  • Karin Baur
    (Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz)
  • József Beck **
    (Rutgers University)
  • Oleksandra Beznosova
    (Baylor University)
  • Dmitriy Bilyk **
    (University of Minnesota)
  • Alexander Bobenko
    (Technische Universität Berlin )
  • James Calvin
    (New Jersey Institute of Technology)
  • Eric Cances
    (Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussees)
  • Emmanuel Candes **
    (Stanford University)
  • Venkat Chandrasekeran
    (California Institute of Technology)
  • William Chen **
    (Macquarie University)
  • Ole Christensen **
    (Technical University of Denmark)
  • Albert Cohen
    (Université de Paris VI (Pierre et Marie Curie))
  • Sonja Cox
    (Eidgenössische TH Hönggerberg)
  • Wolfgang Dahmen
    (RWTH Aachen)
  • Jacqueline Davis **
    (Vanderbilt University)
  • Ronald DeVore **
    (Texas A&M International University (TAMIU))
  • Josef Dick
    (University of New South Wales)
  • Philippe di Francesco
    (Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique Saclay (CEA))
  • Benjamin Doerr
    (Max-Planck-Institut für Informatik)
  • Carola Doerr
    (Max-Planck-Institut für Informatik)
  • Dinh Dung **
    (Vietnam National University)
  • Henri Faure
    (Aix-Marseille University)
  • Maryam Fazel **
    (University of Washington)
  • Vladimir Fock
    (Université de Strasbourg I (Louis Pasteur))
  • Sergey Fomin
    (University of Michigan)
  • Simon Foucart **
    (University of Georgia)
  • Frank (Fuchang) Gao
    (University of Idaho)
  • Michael Gekhtman
    (University of Notre Dame)
  • Anne Gelb
    (Arizona State University)
  • Omar Ghattas
    (University of Texas at Austin)
  • Mike Giles
    (University of Oxford)
  • Max Glick
    (University of Michigan)
  • Michael Gnewuch **
    (Christian-Albrechts Universität Kiel)
  • Alexander Goncharov
    (Brown University)
  • Michael Griebel **
    (Institute for Numerical Simulation )
  • Karlheinz Groechenig **
    (Universität Wien)
  • Philipp Grohs
    (ETH)
  • Sinan Gunturk **
    (Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences)
  • Jarvis Haupt
    (University of Minnesota)
  • Stefan Heinrich **
    (Universität Kaiserslautern)
  • Fred Hickernell
    (Illinois Institute of Technology)
  • Aicke Hinrichs
    (Universität Rostock)
  • Roswitha Hofer
    (Johannes Kepler Universität Linz)
  • Piotr Indyk
    (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
  • Rei Inoue
    (Chiba University)
  • Alex Iosevich
    (University of Rochester)
  • Arnulf Jentzen
    (Eidgenössische TH Hönggerberg)
  • David Johnson
    (Columbia University)
  • Sung Ha Kang **
    (Georgia Institute of Technology)
  • Boris Kashin **
    (Russian Academy of Sciences)
  • Rinat Kedem
    (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)
  • Richard Kenyon
    (Brown University)
  • Boris Khesin
    (University of Toronto)
  • Thorsten Koch
    (Konrad-Zuse-Zentrum für Informationstechnik (ZIB))
  • Felix Krahmer **
    (Georg-August-Universität zu Göttingen)
  • Olga Kravchenko
    (Institut Camille Jordan, Université Lyon 1)
  • Peter Kritzer
    (Johannes Kepler Universität Linz)
  • Thomas Kühn
    (Universität Leipzig)
  • Frances Kuo **
    (University of New South Wales)
  • Michael Lacey **
    (Georgia Institute of Technology)
  • Christiane Lemieux
    (University of Waterloo)
  • Jakob Lemvig **
    (Technical University of Denmark)
  • Yvon Maday
    (Brown University)
  • Michael Mahoney
    (Stanford University)
  • Gloria Mari-Beffa
    (University of Wisconsin)
  • Andrei Marshakov
    (Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics)
  • Sophie Morier-Genoud
    (Université de Paris VI (Pierre et Marie Curie))
  • Thomas Müller-Gronbach **
    (Universität Passau)
  • Habib Najm
    (Sandia National Laboratories)
  • Angelia Nedich
    (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)
  • Deanna Needell **
    (Claremont McKenna College)
  • Andreas Neuenkirch
    (Universität Mannheim)
  • Mila Nikolova **
    (École Normale Supérieure de Cachan)
  • Fabio Nobile
    (École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL))
  • Anthony Nouy
    (Université de Nantes)
  • Erich Novak **
    (Friedrich-Schiller-Universität)
  • Robert Nowak
    (University of Wisconsin)
  • Valentin Ovsienko
    (Université de Reims)
  • Friedrich Pillichshammer
    (Johannes Kepler Universität Linz)
  • Leszek Plaskota
    (University of Warsaw)
  • Rodrigo Platte
    (Arizona State University)
  • Michael Polyak
    (Technion-Israel Institute of Technology)
  • Alex Powell
    (Vanderbilt University)
  • Sanjay Ramassamy
    (Brown University)
  • Holger Rauhut **
    (RWTH Aachen)
  • Klaus Ritter **
    (Universität Kaiserslautern)
    • Justin Romberg
      (Georgia Institute of Technology)
    • Emily Russell **
      (Harvard University)
    • Ed Saff
      (Vanderbilt University)
    • Gus Schrader
      (University of California, Berkeley)
    • Christoph Schwab **
      (ETH)
    • Richard Schwartz
      (Brown University)
    • Michael Shapiro
      (Michigan State University)
    • Chi-Wang Shu **
      (Brown University)
    • Winfried Sickel
      (Friedrich-Schiller-Universität)
    • Pawel Siedlecki **
      (University of Warsaw)
    • Aarti Singh
      (Carnegie Mellon University)
    • Maxim Skriganov **
      (Russian Academy of Sciences)
    • Ian Sloan **
      (University of New South Wales)
    • Fedor Soloviev
      (University of Toronto)
    • Guohui Song
      (Clarkson University)
    • Craig Spencer
      (Kansas State University)
    • Jeremy Staum
      (Northwestern University)
    • Yuri Suris
      (Technische Universität Berlin )
    • Sergei Tabachnikov
      (Institute for Computational and Experimental Research in Mathematics (ICERM))
    • Gongguo Tang
      (University of Wisconsin)
    • Krystal Taylor
      (University of Minnesota)
    • Vladimir Temlyakov **
      (University of South Carolina)
    • Robert Tichy
      (Technische Universität Graz)
    • Michael Todd **
      (Cornell University)
    • Joseph Traub
      (Columbia University)
    • Giancarlo Travaglini
      (Università di Milano - Bicocca)
    • Tino Ullrich **
      (Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn)
    • Alexander Veselov
      (Loughborough University)
    • Aditya Viswanathan **
      (Michigan State University)
    • Hannah Vogel
      (Karl-Franzens-Universität Graz)
    • Mike Wakin
      (Colorado School of Mines)
    • Li Wang **
      (University of California, San Diego)
    • Yang Wang **
      (Michigan State University)
    • Rachel Ward **
      (University of Texas at Austin)
    • Grzegorz Wasilkowski **
      (University of Kentucky)
    • Renato Werneck
      (Microsoft Research)
    • Art Werschulz
      (Columbia University)
    • Rebecca Willett
      (University of Wisconsin)
    • Lauren Williams
      (University of California, Berkeley)
    • Przemyslaw Wojtaszczyk
      (University of Warsaw)
    • Henryk Wozniakowski **
      (Columbia University)
    • John Wright
      (Columbia University)
    • Larisa Yaroslavtseva
      (Universität Passau)
    • Yinyu Ye
      (Stanford University)
    • Ozgur Yilmaz **
      (University of British Columbia)
    • Wotao Yin
      (Rice University)
    • Martin Zachariasen
      (University of Copenhagen)
    • Marguerite Zani
      (Université de Paris XII (Paris-Val-de-Marne))
    • Xiaoqun Zhang
      (Shanghai Jiaotong University)
    • Xiaosheng Zhuang
      (Chinese University of Hong Kong)


    Workshops and Associated Events:

    Fall 2014 Research Clusters

    To participate in a research cluster please apply through the semester program visitors application. Indicate which research cluster you are applying to in the "other comments" section of the application.


    Research Cluster: Computational Challenges in Sparse and Redundant Representations (November 3-21, 2014)


    Organizers:
    Description

    Harmonic analysis provides the mathematical backbone for modern signal and image processing. It also constitutes an important part of the foundation several scientific and engineering areas, including communication theory, control science, fluid dynamics, and electromagnetics, that underpin a much broader set of current applications. Although computer implementation of concepts from harmonic analysis is prevalent, relatively little attention is given to computational and numerical aspects of the discipline in its own literature. Further, many of the most capable young mathematicians working in this area have only modest exposure to the roles of such crucial computational considerations as finite data effects; e.g., How much error is introduced by truncating this infinite-series representation of a function in terms of a frame, and where will it be manifested?

    On the other hand, new tools and ideas have entered the mainstream of harmonic analysis in recent years that have not yet become established in areas of applied mathematics where numerical and computational issues are routinely treated as integral aspects of problem formulation and methodological development. Among these are tools for non-orthogonal and overcomplete representations in linear spaces and the exploitation of sparsity and related (e.g., low rank) assumptions in inverse problems of various types. This research cluster seeks to bridge this perceived gap by (i) fostering understanding and appreciation of the computational perspective among harmonic analysts and (ii) increasing awareness of emerging mathematical tools and techniques in applied harmonic analysis among computational mathematicians.


    Information-Based Complexity and Stochastic Computation (September 15-19, 2014)


    CLICK HERE TO PARTICIPATE
    Review of applications will begin on May 15, 2014
    Organizing Committee
    • Frances Y. Kuo
      (University of New South Wales)
    • Erich Novak
      (Friedrich-Schiller-Universitat)
    • Klaus Ritter
      (Universitat Kaiserslautern)
    • Grzegorz W. Wasilkowski
      (University of Kentucky)
    • Henryk Wozniakowski
      (Columbia University)

     

              [Image courtesy of Dirk Nuyens]
    Description

    Information-based complexity (IBC) deals with the computational complexity of continuous problems for which available information is partial, priced and noisy. IBC provides a methodological background for proving the curse of dimensionality as well as provides various ways of vanquishing this curse.

    Stochastic computation deals with computational problems that arise in probabilistic models or can be efficiently solved by randomized algorithms. Using IBC background, the complexity of stochastic ordinary (SDE) and partial differential (SPDE) equations have been studied.

    Topics covered in the workshop will include: adaptive and nonlinear approximation for SPDEs, infinite-dimensional problems, inverse and ill- posed problems, quasi-Monte Carlo methods, PDEs with random coefficients, sparse/Smolyak grids, stochastic multi-level algorithms, SDEs and SPDEs with nonstandard coefficients, tractability of multivariate problems.

    This workshop will bring together researchers from these different fields. The goal is to explore connections, learn and share techniques, and build bridges.


    • Ali Ahmed
      (Georgia Institute of Technology)
    • Ulas Ayaz
      (Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn)
    • Dmitriy Bilyk
      (University of Minnesota)
    • James Calvin*
      (New Jersey Institute of Technology)
    • Emmanuel Candes
      (Stanford University)
    • Sonja Cox*
      (Eidgenössische TH Hönggerberg)
    • Jacqueline Davis
      (Vanderbilt University)
    • Josef Dick*
      (University of New South Wales)
    • Dinh Dung
      (Vietnam National University)
    • Simon Foucart
      (University of Georgia)
    • Mike Giles *
      (University of Oxford)
    • Michael Gnewuch*
      (Christian-Albrechts Universität Kiel)
    • Michael Griebel
      (Institute for Numerical Simulation )
    • Sinan Gunturk
      (Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences)
    • Stefan Heinrich *
      (Universität Kaiserslautern)
    • Fred Hickernell*
      (Illinois Institute of Technology)
    • Aicke Hinrichs *
      (Universität Rostock)
    • Arnulf Jentzen*
      (Eidgenössische TH Hönggerberg)
    • Sung Ha Kang
      (Georgia Institute of Technology)
    • Felix Krahmer
      (Georg-August-Universität zu Göttingen)
    • Peter Kritzer*
      (Johannes Kepler Universität Linz)
    • Thomas Kühn*
      (Universität Leipzig)
    • Frances Kuo *
      (University of New South Wales)
    • Christiane Lemieux *
      (University of Waterloo)
    • Thomas Müller-Gronbach*
      (Universität Passau)
    • Deanna Needell
      (Claremont McKenna College)
    • Andreas Neuenkirch*
      (Universität Mannheim)
    • Mila Nikolova
      (École Normale Supérieure de Cachan)
    • Erich Novak
      (Friedrich-Schiller-Universität)
    • Robert Nowak
      (University of Wisconsin)
    • Friedrich Pillichshammer *
      (Johannes Kepler Universität Linz)
    • Leszek Plaskota*
      (University of Warsaw)
    • Alex Powell
      (Vanderbilt University)
    • Klaus Ritter
      (Universität Kaiserslautern)
    • Christoph Schwab
      (ETH)
    • Winfried Sickel*
      (Friedrich-Schiller-Universität)
    • Pawel Siedlecki
      (University of Warsaw)
    • Maxim Skriganov
      (Russian Academy of Sciences)
    • Ian Sloan *
      (University of New South Wales)
    • Jeremy Staum*
      (Northwestern University)
    • Vladimir Temlyakov
      (University of South Carolina)
    • Michael Todd
      (Cornell University)
    • Joseph Traub*
      (Columbia University)
    • Tino Ullrich
      (Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn)
    • Li Wang
      (University of California, San Diego)
    • Rachel Ward
      (University of Texas at Austin)
    • Grzegorz Wasilkowski
      (University of Kentucky)
    • Art Werschulz*
      (Columbia University)
    • Henryk Wozniakowski
      (Columbia University)
    • Larisa Yaroslavtseva*
      (Universität Passau)
    • Yinyu Ye*
      (Stanford University)
    • Ozgur Yilmaz
      (University of British Columbia)
    • Marguerite Zani*
      (Université de Paris XII (Paris-Val-de-Marne))

    Approximation, Integration, and Optimization (September 29- October 3, 2014)


    CLICK HERE TO PARTICIPATE
    Review of applications will begin on June 16, 2014
    Organizing Committee
    • Albert Cohen
      (Universite de Paris VI (Pierre et Marie Curie))
    • Ronald Devore
      (Texas A&M International University)
    • Robert Nowak
      (University of Wisconsin)
    • Vladimir Temlyakov
      (University of South Carolina)
    • Rachel Ward
      (University of Texas at Austin)

     

        [Image courtesy of Gerhard Zumbusch]
    Description

    The workshop is devoted to the following problem of fundamental importance throughout science and engineering: how to approximate, integrate, or optimize multivariate functions.

    The breakthroughs demanded by high dimensional problems may be at hand. Good methods of approximation arise as solutions of optimization problems over certain function classes that are now well understood in small and modesty large dimensions.

    In high dimensions, the appropriate models involve sparse representations, which give rise to issues in nonlinear approximation methods such as greedy approximation. High dimensional optimization problems become intractable to solve exactly, but substantial gains in efficiency can be made by allowing for a small probability of failure (probabilistic recovery guarantees), and by seeking approximate solutions (up to a pre-specified threshold) rather than exact solutions. The contemporary requirements of numerical analysis connect approximation, optimization, and probabilistic analysis.

    The workshop will bring together leading experts in approximation, compressed sensing and optimization.


    • Ali Ahmed
      (Georgia Institute of Technology)
    • Ulas Ayaz
      (Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn)
    • Marcus Bachmayr*
      (RWTH Aachen)
    • József Beck
      (Rutgers University)
    • Dmitriy Bilyk
      (University of Minnesota)
    • Eric Cances*
      (Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussees)
    • Emmanuel Candes *
      (Stanford University)
    • Venkat Chandrasekeran*
      (California Institute of Technology)
    • Albert Cohen
      (Université de Paris VI (Pierre et Marie Curie))
    • Wolfgang Dahmen*
      (RWTH Aachen)
    • Jacqueline Davis
      (Vanderbilt University)
    • Ronald DeVore
      (Texas A&M International University (TAMIU))
    • Dinh Dung
      (Vietnam National University)
    • Maryam Fazel *
      (University of Washington)
    • Simon Foucart
      (University of Georgia)
    • Omar Ghattas *
      (University of Texas at Austin)
    • Michael Gnewuch
      (Christian-Albrechts Universität Kiel)
    • Michael Griebel
      (Institute for Numerical Simulation )
    • Sinan Gunturk
      (Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences)
    • Jarvis Haupt*
      (University of Minnesota)
    • Stefan Heinrich
      (Universität Kaiserslautern)
    • Piotr Indyk*
      (Massachusetts Institute of Technology)
    • Sung Ha Kang
      (Georgia Institute of Technology)
    • Felix Krahmer
      (Georg-August-Universität zu Göttingen)
    • Frances Kuo *
      (University of New South Wales)
    • Yvon Maday*
      (Brown University)
    • Michael Mahoney *
      (Stanford University)
    • Thomas Müller-Gronbach
      (Universität Passau)
    • Habib Najm*
      (Sandia National Laboratories)
    • Angelia Nedich*
      (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)
    • Deanna Needell
      (Claremont McKenna College)
    • Mila Nikolova
      (École Normale Supérieure de Cachan)
    • Fabio Nobile*
      (École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL))
    • Anthony Nouy*
      (Université de Nantes)
    • Erich Novak
      (Friedrich-Schiller-Universität)
    • Robert Nowak
      (University of Wisconsin)
    • Alex Powell
      (Vanderbilt University)
    • Holger Rauhut *
      (RWTH Aachen)
    • Klaus Ritter
      (Universität Kaiserslautern)
    • Justin Romberg*
      (Georgia Institute of Technology)
    • Christoph Schwab *
      (ETH)
    • Pawel Siedlecki
      (University of Warsaw)
    • Aarti Singh*
      (Carnegie Mellon University)
    • Maxim Skriganov
      (Russian Academy of Sciences)
    • Ian Sloan *
      (University of New South Wales)
    • Gongguo Tang*
      (University of Wisconsin)
    • Vladimir Temlyakov
      (University of South Carolina)
    • Michael Todd
      (Cornell University)
    • Mike Wakin
      (Colorado School of Mines)
    • Li Wang
      (University of California, San Diego)
    • Rachel Ward
      (University of Texas at Austin)
    • Grzegorz Wasilkowski
      (University of Kentucky)
    • Rebecca Willett
      (University of Wisconsin)
    • Przemyslaw Wojtaszczyk*
      (University of Warsaw)
    • Henryk Wozniakowski *
      (Columbia University)
    • John Wright*
      (Columbia University)
    • Ozgur Yilmaz
      (University of British Columbia)
    • Wotao Yin*
      (Rice University)
    • Xiaoqun Zhang
      (Shanghai Jiaotong University)

    Discrepancy Theory (October 27-31, 2014)


    CLICK HERE TO PARTICIPATE
    Review of applications will begin on July 15, 2014
    Organizing Committee
    • Michael Lacey
      (Georgia Institute of Technology)
    • William Chen
      (Macquarie University)
    • Dmitriy Bilyk
      (University of Minnesota)
    • Aicke Hinrichs
      (Friedrich-Schiller-Universität )
    • Mikhail Lifshits
      (St Petersburg State University)
    • Friedrich Pillichshammer
      (Johannes Kepler Universitat Linz)
              [Image Credit: Dmitriy Bilyk]
    Description

    Discrepancy theory deals with the problem of distributing points uniformly over some geometric object and evaluating the inevitably arising errors. The theory was ignited by such famous early results as Herman Weyl's equidistribution theorem and Klaus Roth's theorem on the irregularities of point distributions.

    The subject has now grown into a broad field with deep connections tomany areas such as number theory, combinatorics, approximation theory, harmonic analysis, and probability theory, in particular empirical and Gaussian processes. The computational aspects of the subject include searching for well-distributed sets and numerical integration rules. Despite years of research, many fundamental questions, especially in high dimensions, remain wide open, although several important advances have been achieved recently.

    The participants of this workshop will share a wide range of views on topics related to discrepancy with an eye towards the recent developments in the subject. The workshop will bring together different communities working on various aspects of discrepancy theory. The exchange of ideas and approaches, the cross-fertilization of viewpoints, sharing the visions of near and far term goals of the field will be the highlight of the conference.


    • Ali Ahmed
      (Georgia Institute of Technology)
    • Christoph Aistleitner*
      (Technische Universität Graz)
    • Ulas Ayaz
      (Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn)
    • Nikhil Bansal *
      (Technische Universiteit Eindhoven)
    • József Beck*
      (Rutgers University)
    • Oleksandra Beznosova*
      (Baylor University)
    • Dmitriy Bilyk
      (University of Minnesota)
    • Emmanuel Candes
      (Stanford University)
    • William Chen
      (Macquarie University)
    • Jacqueline Davis
      (Vanderbilt University)
    • Josef Dick*
      (University of New South Wales)
    • Benjamin Doerr*
      (Max-Planck-Institut für Informatik)
    • Carola Doerr*
      (Max-Planck-Institut für Informatik)
    • Dinh Dung
      (Vietnam National University)
    • Henri Faure*
      (Aix-Marseille University)
    • Simon Foucart
      (University of Georgia)
    • Frank (Fuchang) Gao*
      (University of Idaho)
    • Michael Griebel
      (Institute for Numerical Simulation )
    • Sinan Gunturk
      (Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences)
    • Aicke Hinrichs
      (Universität Rostock)
    • Roswitha Hofer*
      (Johannes Kepler Universität Linz)
    • Alex Iosevich*
      (University of Rochester)
    • Sung Ha Kang
      (Georgia Institute of Technology)
    • Michael Lacey
      (Georgia Institute of Technology)
    • Christiane Lemieux *
      (University of Waterloo)
    • Deanna Needell
      (Claremont McKenna College)
    • Ed Saff*
      (Vanderbilt University)
    • Pawel Siedlecki
      (University of Warsaw)
    • Maxim Skriganov*
      (Russian Academy of Sciences)
    • Craig Spencer*
      (Kansas State University)
    • Krystal Taylor *
      (University of Minnesota)
    • Vladimir Temlyakov
      (University of South Carolina)
    • Robert Tichy*
      (Technische Universität Graz)
    • Giancarlo Travaglini*
      (Università di Milano - Bicocca)
    • Li Wang
      (University of California, San Diego)
    • Rachel Ward
      (University of Texas at Austin)
    • Grzegorz Wasilkowski
      (University of Kentucky)